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, cutting spending in the tax code, and then i think it also keeps our promises to people to seniors who worked hard their whole life and want to nothing more than a secure retirement. and to our veterans to 0 who we made promises as they donned the uniform and fought for our country. >> host: what about the issue of changed cpi. . >> guest: i start with a basic notion that social security has enci ad itbutedp our shben ttal n part of the discussion. certainly we need to be concerned about the long-term solvent sei of social security but again when retirement security is question mark for so many families. i don't think it should be on the table during this part of the discussion during the budget resolution. look at the real contributors to our deficit and debt as we try tackle those challenges. >> host: two final questions before we go to calls. callers are ready. this is another article during an intimate dinner with democratic senators. how come you were left off the list? [laughter] >> guest: i have no idea. [laughter] but i have been very pleased with the president's increase in ou
paying fines, back taxes, that is not amnesty or not nothing. a lots of money. some people may be so rich they think a couple thousand dollars is nothing, but it is not for most people. with earned legal status, you see it in the center-right movement. i see the business community, the small businesses in particular, this is not a fortune 500 issue. farmers and dairymen and ranchers around the country have been explaining that they need this. you see this with the various communities. communities ofs faith are focused on this and saying that we need to move forward on this. from the center-right perspective in terms of the reagan republicans and conservatives, absolutely, yes. it is very powerful. the arguments against it are malice in the left and do not carry a lots of weight with reagan republicans. what are the things i used in my testimony with the nine mins of -- nine myths of immigration, this is back in the 1980 posturing reagan's presidency. it walks through all the things you hear from people who did not like the irish and did not like the jews and did not like the asians and al
put your finger on what we are trying to stay thougertain tax -- certairorize us some kid gets sin street and that terrorizes me because i live here. but that definition in webster has a connection to all legal definitions in that it is a political act. and generally, a political act against noncombatants. one military unit shoots another military unit. that is regular warfare. but when you intentionally attacked civilians for a political purpose, i think everybody agrees that was terrorism we have several elements here in boston. what we do not yet know is whether there was a political purpose. we are assuming there was, but we do not know they're wet -- that for a fact yet. host: someone on twitter reminds us that it was a pressure cooker believed to contain the bomb. likean see what this looks in the new york daily news. what is significant about this to you as we talk about such an easily homemade, crude instrument. guest: ball bearings, nails, pressure kircher ramallah -- pressure cooker, items you can go by this afternoon. look at what timothy mcveigh used, diesel fuel and fe
. you've heard that the first quarter was tough. probably payroll tax impacted more than anything else. and small business is -- and big business for that matter is totally the flux with the obama care act and what it all means. and business is looking at part-time, that you've got to keep people under 30 hours. they don't want to employ more than 50 people. and nobody really knows how this thing is going to work. now, as far as the japanese yen, every major manufacturer in the world has made a strategic decision to produce where they sell. no manufacturer can deal with the volatility in exchange rates. and if you look at where the japanese are today compared to 10, 20 years ago, there is no comparison with let's say 80% produced in north america. so the exchange rate has been dramatically reduced as a factor in our business. and at the moment, i don't see any impact. >> okay, mike, $42. we've been friends a long time. you couldn't tell me at four bucks that that was something i should -- actually, we're not allowed to do it, anyway, but you couldn't have mentioned that back in 2008 or
request is woefully late and full of gimmicks, tax increases, generally unhelpful, but we will persevere. let me begin by taking the opportunity to thank the members of the military for their service, their sacrifice that you are representing here today. as this subcommittee has done in the past, we want to reaffirm our commitment to providing our war fighters with the tools, the training, the equipment and the support necessary to carry out vital security missions throughout the world. appreciation for the members of the military and their service can't be overstated. with continued instability in the middle east and northern africa, to the evolving challenges in the asia pacific region, especially north korea, there's no question that those who serve under our flag these days are doing so during a very critical period in our history. world events often remind us that our country, our freedom, our way of life remain a constant risk and we must take measured steps to protect the values that we hold. in this volatile world, increasingly, we are facing enemies both foreign and domestic. we
that covers the entire extent. every one of those had to be eat late taxed. the congress imposed a more onerous, more restrict it from a comma rules that on my ability to move money from ppa to ppa. i have small pdas with not a lot of money but for whatever reason decided there needed to be more over the national intelligence program. the effect of the fy 13 of her rations that did help us in that it allowed us to move money around civic and that the money into the path we are committed to by virtue of the fact were five men in before we got a bill. sowo ba dister t it. a cab structure, did allow new start,t also frommocountschss here was what many at the endf the day and of course the of sequestration was doubled because we had to take it in seven months. iraq i was. ealistic impact. >> that is helpful because it provides more of a context of things we might be able to do. again, we have a macro issue of sequestration can watch everyone recognizes it's in packs on your programs. but i stand legislative authorization not on this committee that the intelligence that could have the skinny
of it comes from the drug trade. some probably 35 or 40%. some money comes from illicit taxes from afghan people and some money comes from external support from outside the region. >> when you look at the places that they go in pakistan, the frontier areas, double pakistan, -- do you believe pakistan, number one, has control over those areas and number two, can control over those areas? >> senator, pakistan does not have control over those areas right now. they have had over 15,000 killed and wounded in operations in that area over the past decade. they've had hundreds killed and wounded in the past several weeks as they've tried to gain control in the khyber area. i think that's a clear indication they cannot control the border area and the taliban that are operating freely inside of that border area. >> what do you see as a rule for the taliban, if any, in the future afghan government as we transition out, as discussions are taking place. how do you envision that future afghan government? obviously there are elections coming up but how are we looking at the transition for the afghan gov
possessed in this country? and who would pay for it? would gun owners be subject to still more fees or taxes for exercising their second amendment rights? who would have access to the so-called registry? would the public know who owns guns and who does not? who would ensure that this sensitive information is protected and not used for political purposes, and how? we do not know the answers to these questions, but we do know that such restrictions will not prevent the next tragedy. we should not start down this dangerous road. what should we do instead? i have a few suggestions. instead of undermining the second amendment, mr. president, congress should focus its attention on three areas. first, i believe that robust prosecution of violent criminals is the best deterrent for violent crime. prosecutors should punish to the fullest extent of the law individuals who misuse guns, knives or anything else to commit violent crimes. there should be no leniency, mr. president, what ever for the commission of such crimes. secondly, we should examine and address any deficiencies -- and we have them -- i
every bill is too big and every deal tends to be today. so for example, like on tax reform, tomorrow i would lower the income tax. if we can compromise on the number i would lower it to 17% tomorrow. just do it. i don't care if people predicted less revenue, less revenue means more revenue in economy. if you in an enormous boost to ththe con and we like under kennedy, like under coolidge and like under reagan when you reduced rates, sometimes you get more revenue. that is because the deal is to be. same with immigration. we make it harder on ourselves are the debt commission, we make it a lot harder to find a deal when it has a thousand moving parts but i think we should go with the things we agree on and boom, boom, boom. it's why the rate -- that's why the public is so upset with us. all the stuff we agree on we won't pass because we say that will be the sweeter for the bigger deal. which we never seem to be able to get to one that break up all these big deals into smaller deals? i tried to pass the stand these a, science and technology these is expanding those. i tried to pass it by
Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9